I. Rectitude or Justice

Bushido refers not only to martial rectitude, but to personal rectitude: Rectitude or Justice, is the strongest virtue of Bushido. A well-known samurai defines it this way: ‘Rectitude is one’s power to decide upon a course of conduct in accordance with reason, without wavering; to die when to die is right, to strike when to strike is right.’ Another speaks of it in the following terms: ‘Rectitude is the bone that gives firmness and stature. Without bones the head cannot rest on top of the spine, nor hands move nor feet stand. So without Rectitude neither talent nor learning can make the human frame into a samurai.’

II. Courage

Bushido distinguishes between bravery and courage: Courage is worthy of being counted among virtues only if it’s exercised in the cause of Righteousness and Rectitude. In his Analects, Confucius says: ‘Perceiving what is right and doing it not reveals a lack of Courage.’ In short, ‘Courage is doing what is right.’

III. Benevolence or Mercy

A man invested with the power to command and the power to kill was expected to demonstrate equally extraordinary powers of benevolence and mercy: Love, magnanimity, affection for others, sympathy and pity, are traits of Benevolence, the highest attribute of the human soul. Both Confucius and Mencius often said the highest requirement of a ruler of men is Benevolence.

IV. Politeness

Discerning the difference between obsequiousness and politeness can be difficult for casual visitors to Japan, but for a true man, courtesy is rooted in benevolence: Courtesy and good manners have been noticed by every foreign tourist as distinctive Japanese traits. But Politeness should be the expression of a benevolent regard for the feelings of others; it’s a poor virtue if it’s motivated only by a fear of offending good taste. In its highest form Politeness approaches love.

V. Honesty and Sincerity

True samurai, according to author Nitobe, disdained money, believing that “men must grudge money, for riches hinder wisdom.” Thus children of high-ranking samurai were raised to believe that talking about money showed poor taste, and that ignorance of the value of different coins showed good breeding: Bushido encouraged thrift, not for economical reasons so much as for the exercise of abstinence. Luxury was thought the greatest menace to manhood, and severe simplicity was required of the warrior class … the counting machine and abacus were abhorred.

VI. Honor

Though Bushido deals with the profession of soldiering, it is equally concerned with non-martial behavior: The sense of Honor, a vivid consciousness of personal dignity and worth, characterized the samurai. He was born and bred to value the duties and privileges of his profession. Fear of disgrace hung like a sword over the head of every samurai… To take offense at slight provocation was ridiculed as ‘short-tempered.’ As the popular adage put it: ‘True patience means bearing the unbearable.’

VII. Loyalty

Economic reality has dealt a blow to organizational loyalty around the world. Nonetheless, true men remain loyal to those to whom they are indebted: Loyalty to a superior was the most distinctive virtue of the feudal era. Personal fidelity exists among all sorts of men: a gang of pickpockets swears allegiance to its leader. But only in the code of chivalrous Honor does Loyalty assume paramount importance.

VIII. Character and Self-Control

Bushido teaches that men should behave according to an absolute moral standard, one that transcends logic. What’s right is right, and what’s wrong is wrong. The difference between good and bad and between right and wrong are givens, not arguments subject to discussion or justification, and a man should know the difference. Finally, it is a man’s obligation to teach his children moral standards through the model of his own behavior: The first objective of samuraieducation was to build up Character. The subtler faculties of prudence, intelligence, and dialectics were less important. Intellectual superiority was esteemed, but a samurai was essentially a man of action. No historian would argue that Hideyoshi personified the Eight Virtues of Bushidothroughout his life. Like many great men, deep faults paralleled his towering gifts. Yet by choosing compassion over confrontation, and benevolence over belligerence, he demonstrated ageless qualities of manliness. Today his lessons could not be more timely.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2008/09/14/the-bushido-code-the-eight-virtues-of-the-samurai/

14 notes

the neurological war has begun it begun 
the technological war has begun it has begun 
you sit in-front of a screen 
make yourself cry and scream 
to get noticed 
to get noticed …..

the neurological war has begun it begun 

the technological war has begun it has begun 

you sit in-front of a screen 

make yourself cry and scream 

to get noticed 

to get noticed …..

3 notes

there was a little bump on the road 
right then there my shoe got stuck 
and i hoped for luck 
so i jumped and jumped jumped and jumped 
there was some heavyness in the air 
i couldn’t breath 
so i fell down the stairs 
but i ran and ran and ran and ran and ran 
and i colored my shoes 
with some Warhol white and blue 
so the road that seemd so distant 
was coming to existence 
so i jammed and jammed and jammed .

there was a little bump on the road 

right then there my shoe got stuck 

and i hoped for luck 

so i jumped and jumped jumped and jumped 

there was some heavyness in the air 

i couldn’t breath 

so i fell down the stairs 

but i ran and ran and ran and ran and ran 

and i colored my shoes 

with some Warhol white and blue 

so the road that seemd so distant 

was coming to existence 

so i jammed and jammed and jammed .

3 notes

trying to catch some stars 
in a pit full of tar 
and even though they are hard to find 
the reach for the glory 
and make up a billboard story 
its hard to keep the catch in a jar ……..

trying to catch some stars 

in a pit full of tar 

and even though they are hard to find 

the reach for the glory 

and make up a billboard story 

its hard to keep the catch in a jar ……..

1 note

one giant leap for mankind R.I.P Neil Armstrong

one giant leap for mankind R.I.P Neil Armstrong

Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster. And if you gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche, German Philosopher

Battle not with monsters, lest ye become a monster. And if you gaze into the abyss, the abyss gazes also into you.

Friedrich Nietzsche, German Philosopher

flash 9 is required to go fuck yourself

(Source: chunknocaptainchunk)

65,398 notes

nevver:

  1. Bling (n): Expensive, ostentatious clothing and jewelry.
  2. Bromance (n): A close but non-sexual relationship between two men.
  3. Chillax (v): Calm down and relax.
  4. Crunk (adj): Very excited or full of energy.
  5. D’oh (ex): Exclamation used to comment on a foolish or stupid action, especially one’s own.
  6. Droolworthy (adj): Extremely attractive or desirable.
  7. Frankenfood (n): Genetically modified food.
  8. Grrrl (n): A young woman regarded as independent and strong or aggressive, especially in her attitude to men or in her sexuality (A blend of “Grrrr” and “Girl.”)
  9. Guyliner (n): Eyeliner that is worn by men.
  10. Hater (n): A person who greatly dislikes a specified person or thing.
  11. Illiterati (n): People who are not well educated or well informed about a particular subject or sphere of activity.
  12. Infomania (n): The compulsive desire to check or accumulate news and information, typically via mobile phone or computer.
  13. Jeggings (n): Tight-fitting stretch trousers for women, styled to resemble a pair of denim jeans.
  14. La-la Land (n): A fanciful state or dream world. Also, Los Angeles.
  15. Locavore (n): A person whose diet consists only or principally of locally grown or produced food.
  16. Mankini (n): A brief one-piece bathing garment for men, with a T-back.
  17. Mini-Me (n): A person closely resembling a smaller or younger version of another.
  18. Muffin Top (n): A roll of fat visible above the top of a pair of women’s tight-fitting low-waisted trousers.
  19. Muggle (n): A person who is not conversant with a particular activity or skill.
  20. Noob (n): A person who is inexperienced in a particular sphere or activity, especially computing or the use of the Internet.
  21. Obvs (adv): Obviously.
  22. OMG (ex): Used to express surprise, excitement, or disbelief. (Dates back to 1917.)
  23. Po-po (n): The police.
  24. Purple State (n): A US state where the Democratic and Republican parties have similar levels of support among voters.
  25. Screenager (n): A person in their teens or twenties who has an aptitude for computers and the Internet.
  26. Sexting (n): The sending of sexually explicit photographs or messages via mobile phone.
  27. Textspeak (n): Language regarded as characteristic of text messages, consisting of abbreviations, acronyms, initials, emoticons. (wut hpns win u write lyk dis.)
  28. Totes (adv): Totally.
  29. Truthiness (n): the quality of seeming or being felt to be true, even if not necessarily true.
  30. Twitterati (n): Keen or frequent users of the social networking site Twitter.
  31. Unfriend (v): Remove (someone) from a list of friends or contacts on a social networking site.
  32. Upcycle (v): Reuse (discarded objects or material) in such a way as to create a product of higher quality or value than the original.
  33. Whatevs (ex, adv): Whatever.
  34. Whovian (n): A fan of the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who.
  35. Woot (ex): (Especially in electronic communication) Used to express elation, enthusiasm, or triumph.

Please kill me.

3,196 notes